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The English Cathedrals  
 
There are forty-two dioceses remaining today in England, each with its own cathedral (see the list of English cathedrals).

The cathedrals of Britain

A diocese is the geographical area which falls under the administration of a bishop. Each diocese has a church where the bishop's throne or seat of office is located, this church is known as the cathedral.

The cathedral must not necessarily be the largest church in the diocese: Christ Church in Oxford is an example of a small cathedral. It is also not necessarily the grandest church: Westminster Abbey in London has today no bishop's throne and so, despite its grandeur and wealth of history, it is not a cathedral.

Twenty-six of the forty-two English cathedrals can be described as ancient in that the church building dates back to medieval times. Twenty-two of these twenty-six have had cathedral status since medieval times.



The establishment of the English cathedrals can be divided into three eras:

1. The ancient cathedrals.
Seventeen English cathedrals were established in medieval times. Beginning in 597 - when St Augustine set up a monastery at Canterbury - through until the foundation of the cathedral at Carlisle in 1133.


2. The cathedrals founded under Henry VIII.
For over 400 years no new cathedrals were founded in England until the reign of Henry VIII. Then in the 1540s, after the dissolution of the monasteries, Henry created six new dioceses at Gloucester, Oxford, Peterborough, Chester, Bristol and Westminster (cathedral status withdrawn 10 years later) where new cathedrals were then established.

3. The cathedrals founded in the 19th and 20th Centuries.
Again time passed, this time nearly 300 years, until 1836 when a new diocese was created at Ripon in Yorkshire. Over the next century a further nineteen new dioceses together with their respective cathedrals were set up.

Many of these were as a response to the urbanisation of England, with new cathedrals being established in major cities where the population had increased so dramatically during the 19th century. The last cathedrals were established in 1927.




The following list shows the forty-two present-day English cathedrals and when they were founded.

 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 
Dioceses / cathedrals in England
from the
6-12th century
 
Dioceses / cathedrals in England
from the
16th century
 
Dioceses / cathedrals in England
from the
19-20th century
 
     
Year
bishop
apptd.
Diocese / Cathedral
Year
bishop
apptd.
Diocese / Cathedral
Year
bishop
apptd.
Diocese / Cathedral

 

597
Canterbury (A)

Painting
Photograph
 

1541

 

Gloucester (A)

Painting
Photograph
 

1836

Ripon (AC)

 
                 
604
Rochester (A)

Painting
Photograph
1541

Christ Church, Oxford (A)

Painting
Photograph

1848

Manchester (P)

Painting
Photograph

                 
604
1541

Peterborough (A)

Painting
Photograph

1877

St Albans (AC)

Painting
Photograph

                 
625
York (A)

Painting
Photograph
1541
Chester (A)

Painting
Photograph

1877

Truro (N)

Painting
Photograph

                 
660
Winchester (A)

Painting
Photograph
1542

1880

Liverpool (N)

Painting
Photograph

                 
669
Lichfield (A)

Painting
Photograph

1882

Newcastle (P)

Painting
Photograph

           
676
Hereford (A)

Painting
Photograph

1884

Southwell (AC)

Painting
Photograph

           
680
Worcester (A)

Painting
Photograph

1888

Wakefield (P)

Painting
Photograph

           
909
Wells (A)

Painting
Photograph

1905

Birmingham (P)

Painting
Photograph

           
990
Durham (A)

Painting
Photograph

1905

Southwark (AC)

Painting
Photograph

           
1050
Exeter (A)

Painting
Photograph

1914

Chelmsford (P)

Painting
Photograph

           
1072
Lincoln (A)

Painting
Photograph

1914

St Edmundsbury (P)

Painting
Photograph

           
1075
Chichester (A)

Painting
Photograph

1914

Sheffield (P)

Painting
Photograph

           
1078
Salisbury (A)

Painting
Photograph

 

1918

Coventry (N)

Painting
Photograph

           
1091
Norwich (A)

Painting
Photograph

 

1919

Bradford (P)

Painting
Photograph

           
1109
Ely (A)

Painting
Photograph
BBC:
Ely cathedral

1926

Blackburn (P)

Painting
Photograph

           
1133
Carlisle (A)

Painting
Photograph

1927

Derby (P)

Painting
Photograph

           
       
1927
Guildford (N)

Painting
Photograph
     
       
1927
Leicester (P)

Painting
Photograph
     
       
1927
Portsmouth (P)

Painting
Photograph
     
           
 
Key
A Ancient cathedral The twenty-two cathedrals which have had cathedral status since medieval times.
AC Ancient church The four cathedrals which have not always had cathedral status, but since medieval times have been churches of importance.
N Newly built The four cathedrals which were newly built in recent times.
P Parish church The twelve cathedrals which were once the parish church and have attained cathedral status in recent times.
 


  The Welsh Cathedrals  
 

In Wales there are
six dioceses.

Four of the cathedrals that serve these dioceses were founded on sites where major monasteries have existed since the 6th century, with Celtic bishops being appointed long before St Augustine established a monastery at Canterbury in 597.

Bangor has been the site of a cathedral since c. 525, St Asaph (the smallest cathedral in England and Wales) was founded in 573, at St Davids a cathedral had been founded by 589, and at Llandaff records of Celtic bishops being appointed exist back to the middle of the 6th century.

During the 20th century two new dioceses were created in Wales. The diocese of Monmouth was established in 1921 and St Woolos attained full status as its cathedral in 1949. The diocese of Swansea and Brecon was established in 1923 when Brecon became its cathedral.
 


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